. . . how do you express it in your online course?

 

 

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I know it will cause a scandal, but I don't think of my job as student-centered, nor is it teacher- or self-centered, but rather, learnING-centered.  There's a job to do that's shared by the whole class together.
Not at all... i think that is a great comment. I would love to hear some examples of stuff you do in your course that is learnING-centered  : )
The main thing is to focus the students on the practical value of what they're learning by situating the assignments in real-world tasks, where the purpose is to provide something valuable to real people.  I pose a very small number--two or three--multi-stage projects, the first one an interview project concerning the value (or lack thereof) of good writing for professional life, and the last one focused on a topic area defined variously by what each of them would like to ddo for a living some years down the road.  I manage to get about eight grading events out of those.

Alexandra M. Pickett said:
Not at all... i think that is a great coment. I would love to hear some examples of stuff you do in your course that is learnING-centered  : )

Great question. I know what I mean by student centered but haven't ever tried to communicate it, so here’s an attempt.

To me, student centered learning means that the course is all about (and the syllabus describes) what the students will do, not what the teacher will do or what the “topic” is.

In any course, but particularly in an online course, each objective should be accompanied by a description of the activity that students will complete to either practice it, assess it, or both.

In my early years teaching, I was confronted by a graduate student who asked a question which I was not sure of the answer or how to answer it.  When asked by my director how I was doing I mentioned the incident to him.  He indicated that I should not be doing any research on this but the student should seek out the answer to his question.  Later in the class the same student asked a question; I wasn't sure of the answer and suggested to him that he research his question and make a presentation to the class on what he found.  I told him where he could research his question, indicated a couple situations in the real world he could look at.  The next week he presented and commented to the class that the assignment I gave him was very interesting and rewarding for him.  I was gratified, regained my feeling of self-worth, and had a student and class that found the results appropo.  This action was "student-centered".
@Marguerite--If more people were to define it your way, I would drop my opposition to Student centeredness. (P.S., Marguerite was my grandmother's name,Lovely name.)

Marguerite Moore said:
In my early years teaching, I was confronted by a graduate stud ent who asked a question which I was not sure of the answer or how to answer it.  When asked by my director how I was doing I mentioned the incident to him.  He indicated that I should not be doing any research on this but the student should seek out the answer to his question.  Later in the class the same student asked a question; I wasn't sure of the answer and suggested to him that he research his question and make a presentation to the class on what he found.  I told him where he could research his question, indicated a couple situations in the real world he could look at.  The next week he presented and commented to the class that the assignment I gave him was very interesting and rewarding for him.  I was gratified, regained my feeling of self-worth, and had a student and class that found the results appropo.  This action was "student-centered".
Student-centered means that the entire curriculum is designed for and around the students.  That means the course is designed in such a way that it encourages social learning theory, and it gets students to interact with each other so that they can learn from one another.  It means there are choices built into the course that allow each individual student to follow their own learning path.  The general framework is created by the instructor to include all the components necessary to complete the course successfully; however, as the student progresses through the course, they can hone in on what interests and is relevant to their studies.  In this way, the course becomes very individualized for each student.  Then, as student follow their own path of learning, they are sharing what they learn with others and there is this constant flow of new ideas...social learning.

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Created by Alexandra M. Pickett Aug 19, 2010 at 11:52am. Last updated by Alexandra M. Pickett May 20.

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