*Create a logical consistent modular course structure

 OSCQR Design & Layout | OSCQR 3.16 | OSCQR 3.17

You will need to "chunk" the content of your course in to digestible pieces or modules to give it structure, consistency, and form for online presentation and delivery to your students.

Your pedagogical approach, the nature of your content, and the constraints and features of the online asynchronous environment are what will determine how you "chunk" your course.

  • Consider your goals and content and see whether chunks naturally emerge.
  • Look at examples of how others have "chunked" their courses. Depending on what is being taught and how the instructor teaches, a module canbe created by:
    1. Content-specific topics
    2. Chapters of a textbook you are using
    3. Date or time frame
    4. Metaphor
    5. Steps in a process
    6. Any of these methods may be combined.

Use modules to present course content and activities into “chunks.” 

  • The Magic number of modules is 7 (plus or minus two). 
    1. Consider your goals and content and see whether chunks naturally emerge. 
    2. Look at examples of how others have "chunked" their courses. 
    3. Depending on what is being taught and how the instructor teaches, a module can be created by:
      1. Content-specific topics
      2. Chapters of a textbook you are using
      3. Date or time frame
      4. Metaphor
      5. Steps in a process
        Any of these methods may be combined.
  • Use module titles, section categories, document titles, subject lines as advanced organizers.

  • Provide a Module Overview for each course module. Your module overview document should cover the following:
    1. Goals or objectives for the specific module  
    2. Learning activities for the module: what students will be doing as they work through the module. Keep in mind that reading subject content is a learning activity, as are any "off-line" activities, such as interviews or observations, which you might require students to do as part of your course. Other activities might include discussions and written assignments such as papers, essays, or tests.
    3. Methods of evaluation: How will student work in the module be evaluated?  
    4. Link to the course calendar for specific due dates.

Create and duplicate a consistent module structure for each course module. 

Anatomy of a Module:    OSCQR 3.16

  • Provide a Module Overview and "What's due when?" information
  • Present Content:
  • Determine/Design Interactions:
    • Online Reading, videos, listen, presentations
    • Online Interaction (discussion)
    • Group work/projects (collaboration)
    • Off-Line activities: observations, experiments, reading
    • Learner reporting, writing, critique, analysis, etc.
  • Provide expectations for, and areas such as, Ask a Question & Talk with the Professor to support social and teaching presences and regular and substantive interaction.
  • Plan and integrate opportunities for self and peer-assessment, evaluation and/or reflection to check understanding, assess learning, and provide opportunities for learners to draft and iterate, apply concepts and make thinking and learning visible and open to feedback and evaluation.
  • Set expectations and plan how feedback will be delivered including rubrics, text, audio and video feedback.

Course Structure Planning Guide 

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